Global Studies Curriculum

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    HONORS WORLD ART STUDIO
    5 Credits, Grade 9
    This course is designed to provide students with a deep and pervasive knowledge of art history as well as hands-on experience in various mediums.   This serves as a basis for the examination of art, geography and culture in relation to the evolution of the human experience.  Students will explore the following essential questions: What is the connection between art and culture? How do belief systems manifest themselves in art? Why are there differences between eastern and western art? How does global conflict affect art? CODE # 231150

    HONORS WORLD LITERATURE AND WRITERS' WORKSHOP 
    5 Credits, Grade 9
    Honors World Literature and Writer’s Workshop prepares students for the diversity of global literature by responding to it in a clear, cogent manner. As a survey course in the Contemporary Global Issues and the Law and Public Service Learning Centers, the Honors World Literature and Writer’s Workshop prepares students for the rigors of writing both expository and non-expository pieces in line with the Core Content Curriculum Standards. After reading all core pieces, both in class and assigned readings, all material will be discussed thoroughly in class and monitored by both the teacher and the student. Required readings include: Unit One: The Odyssey, The Epic of Gilgamesh, Big Fish- Daniel Wallace; Unit Two: King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table by Roger Lancelyn Green; Unit Three: Romeo and Juliet; Unit Four: The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck, “How Much Land Does A Man Need?”- Leo Tolstoy; Unit Five: All Quiet on the Western Front - Erich Maria Remarque or Hiroshima- John Hersey. All core pieces are noted with an asterisk in the “Instructional Resources and Materials” section of each unit. CODE #'s 220650 and 231250 

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    This course begins with an introductory look at the discipline in general. The initial unit studies how we assess trends in human geography. Included are the basic principles, concepts, and terminology essential to understanding the discipline. Students will then assess human geography in all of its various forms. Students will further understand political geography, development, industrialization, agriculture, services, industry, and other essential concepts. The final unit of this course analyzes mans pursuit of resources and the potential effects this may have for the globe. CODE # 's 232250 and 182650

    HONORS MODERN GLOBAL ANALYSIS  
    5 Credits, Grade 9
    Honors Modern Global Analysis, part of the Contemporary Global Issues Program, is a course designed to challenge students to view global issues and challenges from an informed and insightful perspective. Students will analyze a variety of modern issues in the global community, as well as gain historical perspective from world history components designed to coincide with issues discussed in class. Honors Modern Global Analysis covers areas of study ranging from global warming and other threats to the environment, to in-depth analyses of modern conflicts in Africa and the Middle East. Students are also engaged in year-long studies of particular nations, presentations dealing with unique topics of international significance, and current event discussions and analyses. Honors Modern Global Analysis is an essential course in the larger curriculum of Contemporary Global Issues. Students will be introduced to several concepts, skills, and scenarios that will effectively prepare them for their future endeavors in the advanced social sciences. CODE # 231050

    HONORS PHILOSOPHY  
    2.5 Credits, Grade 11
    Honors philosophy examines ideas regarding the structure of an argument, the role and relationship of citizenship, justice, religion and government. Students are asked to consider essential questions which are directly linked to the standards prescribed in the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. This course will focus on analyzing the corner stones of society and the relationship citizens have with them. Essential questions focusing on political philosophy and its relationship with society, politics and human nature, advocates political goals and the institutional means to them, the reasons behind the essential nature of the state and the citizens’ rights and duties. Students will recognize the ways in which theses studies interact and attempt to answer basic questions concerning human conduct and order through historical study of philosophical writings dating from the classical to modern periods.
    CODE # 23315X

    HONORS INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DIPLOMACY  
    2.5 Credits, Grade 9
    International Relations and Diplomacy, part of the Global Studies Learning Center program at Freehold Township High School, is a course designed to challenge students to analyze global competition, conflict, trade, and cooperation from an informed and insightful perspective. Students will analyze the origins and resiliency of political order in general, before applying that knowledge to understand the complex nature of relations between states, non-governmental organizations, and other political entities. The course covers areas of study ranging from the origins of Western liberal democracies, Marxist regimes, and the ancient city-states of Mesopotamia to the diplomatic intricacies involved in modern international relations such as the Russian-Ukrainian conflict, the War on Terror, and China-US relations. International Relations and Diplomacy is an essential course in the larger curriculum of the Global Studies Learning Center. Students will be introduced to several concepts, skills, and scenarios that will effectively prepare them for their future endeavors in the advanced social sciences. CODE # 23135X

    HONORS UNITED STATES IN THE WORLD  
    5 Credits, Grade 10
    This course prepares students to use higher level thinking to critically analyze and evaluate problems, decisions and turning points in American History. Honors United States in the World is the pre-requisite to AP United States History. This course, through methods of testing, projects, writing, in-class debate and discussion and independent learning introduces students to the skills required to be successful in an AP class, on the AP exam and in their higher-level studies after high school. The objective of this course is to have students understand the foundations of American culture, economy, politics and society through a variety of learning endeavors. Students will participate in class simulation activities, independent learning and other activities in a collegiate style learning environment. CODE # 232150

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS  
    5 Credits, Grade 10
    During the course of each unit, students will develop an intricate understanding of each nation’s political and cultural history, institutions, party system, economic policies, social policies, political culture, and demographic trends. Each subsequent nation studied will be analyzed through comparison with the previous units. Current and controversial issues will be explored in depth through research and construction of current event analyses portfolios for each exemplar nation. The final unit of this course will involve cumulative projects. An individually researched, composed, and delivered speech on a controversial issue will demonstrate students’ ability to formulate and voice informed arguments. A cooperatively-based cultural analysis and demonstration will prove students’ abilities to reach consensus, empathize with the varied cultures and societies that have been studied throughout this course, and present their understandings to other students throughout the school community. The end goal is increased appreciation and empathy for diverse communities from around the globe. CODE # 232050

    HONORS AMERICAN LITERATURE AND RESEARCH WORKSHOP  
    5 Credits, Grade 10
    The Honors American Literature and Research Seminar is a five-credit course that aligns to the Common Core Standards and satisfies one year of the New Jersey requirement for four years of English. The course focuses on research practice, study of rhetoric, and consciousness of perspective designed to develop independent thinkers. The thematic units include such topics as oppression, religious indoctrination, rhetorical conviction, and American idealism. By design, students will read and analyze through a lens of social criticism understanding the deeper impact that all forms of literature have upon our collective cultural identity. Students are expected to research and read independently as well as collaborate and contribute to discussion. Practices of close reading and Socratic seminars provide an opportunity for students to construct logical arguments and evaluate validity of sources. Synthesis of research and organization are skills essential to this course. A variety of writing formats including journals, formal academic papers, reflections, and Document-Based Questions require students to practice and recognize the importance of form and purpose in composition. As citizens of a changing world where communication is both complicated and enhanced by technology, students will be expected to hone public speaking skills and techniques. Ultimately, students will incorporate communication and reading skills learned throughout the course to their independent studies in service learning. Conversely, they will use that real world knowledge to inform their perspective of the American social experience as they relate to poetry and prose. CODE # 232350

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT US HISTORY  
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    This course prepares students to use higher level thinking to critically analyze and evaluate problems, decisions and turning points in American History. AP United States History culminates in an Advanced Placement exam. This course, through methods of testing, projects, writing, in-class debate and discussion and independent learning teaches students educational skills that will help them to succeed in college and beyond. The objective of this course is to have students understand the lasting impacts and future of American culture, economy, politics and society through a variety of learning endeavors. Students will participate in class simulation activities, independent learning and other activities in a collegiate style learning environment. CODE # 233250

    INTERNATIONAL LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS  
    2.5 Credits, Grade 11
    International Law and Human Rights is designed to instill students with informed and insightful perspectives in the analysis of the history, current trends, and projected future challenges in the fields of International Law and Human Rights. Students will analyze the concept of precedent in both International Law and Human Rights, placing the evolution of each discipline in its proper historical context. The course covers areas of study ranging from the theoretical underpinnings of natural law and crimes against humanity prosecutions, to the modern application of legal precedents in human rights cases, and to relevant examples in the contemporary world. will be introduced to several concepts, skills, and scenarios that will effectively prepare them for their future endeavors in the advanced social sciences. CODE # 23355X

    REGIONAL STUDIES I: LATIN AMERICAN & THE CARIBBEAN  
    2.5 Credits, Grade 11
    Regional Studies I: Latin America and the Caribbean is designed to expose students to political, social, cultural, and economic trends in modern Latin America and the Caribbean. Students will analyze the 20th century history of each region and use these insights as an intellectual springboard for assessing modern challenges in both. The course covers areas of study ranging from the impact of the Cold War, the rise of leftist regimes, and the unique economic challenges facing Latin America and the Caribbean. Regional Studies I: Latin America and the Caribbean is an essential course in the larger curriculum of the Global Studies Learning Center. Students will be introduced to several concepts, skills, and scenarios that will effectively prepare them for their future endeavors in the advanced social sciences. CODE # 23365X

    HONORS SENIOR SEMINAR  
    5 Credits, Grade 12
     Because the senior seminar curriculum goes beyond the traditional subject divisions and focuses on the student’s individual interests, access to media center resources and computer technology are required. This course will be facilitated through on-line communication among teachers and students. Students will be required to use the web-based course to submit assignments and communicate with each other. The mission of the Senior Seminar course is to synthesize prior learning with new learning to develop a sophisticated global understanding in every graduating learning center student. CODE # 232450

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT MICROECONOMICS  
    2.5 Credits, Grades 10-12
    Microeconomics looks at specific economic units. At this level of analysis, the students will observe the details of an economic unit, or very small segment of the economy, under the figurative microscope. In microeconomics, we talk of an individual industry, firm, or household. We measure the price of a specific product, the number of workers employed by a single firm, the revenue or income of a particular firm, or household, or the expenditures of a specific firm, government entity, or family. In microeconomics, we examine the trees, not the forest. CODE # 02176X

    REGIONAL STUDIES II
    Students will develop an understanding of the peoples and regions of South and East Asia or select countries in the region. Under study will be some of the oldest civilizations in the world. Students will also examine the complex continent of Africa and its post-colonial relationships with other nations of the world.    

    HONORS GLOBAL COMMERCE *CLASS OF 2018 ONLY*  
    2.5 Credits
    The Honors Global Commerce course is comprised of six general areas of study: Markets, Production, Consumption, Income and Labor, Government and Laws, and Commerce and Modern Technology. Within the framework of these topics, students will engage in a variety of activities meant to further enforce the content. For example, students will take part in the mock creation of a transnational corporation, specializing in the conceptual origin, research, production, and distribution of their own product. Students will also engage in product creation projects where they will assess the various modes of production and the potential markets where their product can be sold. As a semester‐based honors course, Honors Global Commerce will incorporate in‐depth class discussions and written research assignments in order to fully grasp and reinforce significant concepts. CODE # 23245X