International Baccalaureate (Freehold Township & Howell only)

  • BIOLOGY HL YEAR 1
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    Group 4 students at standard level (SL) and higher level (HL) undertake a common core syllabus, a common internal assessment (IA) scheme and have some overlapping elements in the option studied. They are presented with a syllabus that encourages the development of certain skills, attributes, and attitudes, as described in the “Assessment objectives” section of the guide. While the skills and activities of group 4 science subjects are common to students at both SL and HL, students at HL are required to study some topics in greater depth, in the additional higher level (AHL) material and in the common options. The distinction between SL and HL is one of breadth and depth.
     
    BIOLOGY HL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    Group 4 students at standard level (SL) and higher level (HL) undertake a common core syllabus, a common internal assessment (IA) scheme and have some overlapping elements in the option studied. They are presented with a syllabus that encourages the development of certain skills, attributes, and attitudes, as described in the “Assessment objectives” section of the guide. While the skills and activities of group 4 science subjects are common to students at both SL and HL, students at HL are required to study some topics in greater depth, in the additional higher level (AHL) material and in the common options. The distinction between SL and HL is one of breadth and depth. 
     
    BIOLOGY SL YEAR 1 
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    Through studying biology, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the scientific method may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that characterizes IB Biology SL. During this course, which must include at least 150 instruction hours, students will engage in at least 40 hours on practical activities and scientific investigation. These aims enable students, through the overarching theme of the nature of science, to appreciate scientific study and creativity within a global context through stimulating and challenging opportunities. In addition, students will acquire a body of knowledge, methods, and techniques that characterize science and technology. They will be able to analyze, evaluate and synthesize scientific information, develop critical awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities and develop experimental and investigative skills including the use of current technologies and apply 21st-century communication skills in the study of science. Students will, as global citizens, become aware of the ethical implications and limitations of using science and technology, and they will develop an understanding of the relationships amongst scientific disciplines and their influence on other areas of knowledge. Group 4 students at standard level (SL) and higher level (HL) undertake a common core syllabus, a common internal assessment (IA) scheme and have some overlapping elements in the option studied. They are presented with a syllabus that encourages the development of certain skills, attributes, and attitudes, as described in the “Assessment objectives” section of the guide. While the skills and activities of group 4 science subjects are common to students at both SL and HL, students at HL are required to study some topics in greater depth, in the additional higher level (AHL) material, and in the common options. The distinction between SL and HL is one of breadth and depth.  
     
    BIOLOGY SL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    Through studying biology, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the scientific method may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that characterizes IB Biology SL. During this course, which must include at least 150 instruction hours, students will engage in at least 40 hours on practical activities and scientific investigation. These aims enable students, through the overarching theme of the nature of science, to appreciate scientific study and creativity within a global context through stimulating and challenging opportunities. In addition, students will acquire a body of knowledge, methods, and techniques that characterize science and technology. They will be able to analyze, evaluate and synthesize scientific information, develop critical awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities and develop experimental and investigative skills including the use of current technologies and apply 21st-century communication skills in the study of science. Students will, as global citizens, become aware of the ethical implications and limitations of using science and technology, and they will develop an understanding of the relationships amongst scientific disciplines and their influence on other areas of knowledge. Group 4 students at standard level (SL) and higher level (HL) undertake a common core syllabus, a common internal assessment (IA) scheme and have some overlapping elements in the option studied. They are presented with a syllabus that encourages the development of certain skills, attributes, and attitudes, as described in the “Assessment objectives” section of the guide. While the skills and activities of group 4 science subjects are common to students at both SL and HL, students at HL are required to study some topics in greater depth, in the additional higher level (AHL) material, and in the common options. The distinction between SL and HL is one of breadth and depth. 
     
    DESIGN TECHNOLOGY SL YEAR 1
    2.5 Credits, Grade 11
    The International Baccalaureate Organization provides the following course description: “Design Technology focuses on analysis, design development, synthesis, and evaluation. The creative tension between theory and practice is what characterizes Design Technology within the DP sciences subject group. Inquiry and problem-solving are at the heart of the subject. DP Design Technology requires the use of the DP design cycle as a tool, which provides the methodology used to structure the inquiry and analysis of problems, the development of feasible solutions, and the testing and evaluation of the solution. In Diploma Programme Design Technology, a solution can be defined as a model, prototype, product or system that students have developed independently. It achieves a high level of design literacy by enabling students to develop critical-thinking and design skills, which they can apply in a practical context. While designing may take various forms, it will involve the selective application of knowledge within an ethical framework. A well-planned design program enables students to develop not only practical skills but also strategies for creative and critical thinking.” 
     
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    The International Baccalaureate Organization provides the following course description: “Design Technology focuses on analysis, design development, synthesis and evaluation. The creative tension between theory and practice is what characterizes Design Technology within the DP sciences subject group. Inquiry and problem-solving are at the heart of the subject. DP Design Technology requires the use of the DP design cycle as a tool, which provides the methodology used to structure the inquiry and analysis of problems, the development of feasible solutions, and the testing and evaluation of the solution. In Diploma Programme Design Technology, a solution can be defined as a model, prototype, product or system that students have developed independently. It achieves a high level of design literacy by enabling students to develop critical-thinking and design skills, which they can apply in a practical context. While designing may take various forms, it will involve the selective application of knowledge within an ethical framework. A well-planned design programme enables students to develop not only practical skills but also strategies for creative and critical thinking.”

    HISTORY HL YEAR 1
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    Students at higher level (HL) are presented with a syllabus that has a common core consisting of prescribed subjects and topics in world history. Students at HL are also required to undertake an in-depth study of three sections from one of the HL regional options. Students will also carry out a historical investigation. IB History HL will include the following topics over two years of study: The Move to Global War; Causes and Effects of 20th Century War; The Cold War: Superpower tensions and rivalries (20th century); The Great Depression and the Americas (1920s to 1939); The Second World War and the Americas (1933-1945); The Cold War and the Americas (1945-1981); and Civil Rights and Social Movements and the Americas (post 1945). 

    HISTORY HL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    Students at higher level (HL) are presented with a syllabus that has a common core consisting of prescribed subjects and topics in world history. Students at HL are also required to undertake an in-depth study of three sections from one of the HL regional options. Students will also carry out a historical investigation. IB History HL will include the following topics over two years of study: The Move to Global War; Causes and Effects of 20th Century War; The Cold War: Superpower tensions and rivalries (20th century); The Great Depression and the Americas (1920s to 1939); The Second World War and the Americas (1933-1945); The Cold War and the Americas (1945-1981); and Civil Rights and Social Movements and the Americas (post 1945). 

    INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY SL YEAR 1
    2.5 Credits, Grade 11
    The nature of the subject is defined by the use of fundamental ITGS terms. For the purpose of the ITGS syllabus, the following definitions apply. “Information technology” (IT) is the study, design, development, implementation, support or maintenance of computer-based information systems. “Social and ethical significance” refers to the effects that the development, implementation, and use of information technology has on individuals and societies. Social impacts and ethical considerations are not mutually exclusive and are therefore categorized as a single entity. However, in general: social impacts tend to refer to the effects of IT on human life and ethical considerations tend to refer to the responsibility and accountability involved in the design and implementation of IT. An “information system” is a collection of people, information technologies, data, processes, and policies organized to accomplish specific functions and solve specific problems. 

    INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY SL YEAR 2                 
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    The nature of the subject is defined by the use of fundamental ITGS terms. For the purpose of the ITGS syllabus, the following definitions apply. “Information technology” (IT) is the study, design, development, implementation, support or maintenance of computer-based information systems. “Social and ethical significance” refers to the effects that the development, implementation, and use of information technology has on individuals and societies. Social impacts and ethical considerations are not mutually exclusive and are therefore categorized as a single entity. However, in general: social impacts tend to refer to the effects of IT on human life and ethical considerations tend to refer to the responsibility and accountability involved in the design and implementation of IT. An “information system” is a collection of people, information technologies, data, processes, and policies organized to accomplish specific functions and solve specific problems.

    LATIN HL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    The International Baccalaureate Organization provides the following description: “At the heart of the courses is the study of Latin or Classical Greek. It is considered that, through an understanding of the workings of a language, students can encounter issues and ideas from the past, in itself an idea that students need to examine critically. Learning the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the language is not an end in itself but enables students to read a variety of literature combined in different options, and, through analysis and interpretation, to try to understand the ancient world from a contemporary viewpoint.”

    LATIN SL YEAR 1                      
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    At the heart of the courses is the study of Latin or Classical Greek. It is considered that, through an understanding of the workings of a language, students can encounter issues and ideas from the past, in itself an idea that students need to examine critically. Learning the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the language is not an end in itself but enables students to read a variety of literature combined in different options, and, through analysis and interpretation, to try to understand the ancient world from a contemporary viewpoint.

    LATIN SL YEAR 2                    
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    At the heart of the courses is the study of Latin or Classical Greek. It is considered that, through an understanding of the workings of a language, students can encounter issues and ideas from the past, in itself an idea that students need to examine critically. Learning the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the language is not an end in itself but enables students to read a variety of literature combined in different options, and, through analysis and interpretation, to try to understand the ancient world from a contemporary viewpoint.

    LITERATURE HL YEAR 1                    
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    Through the study of a wide range of literature, the Language A: Literature course encourages students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches. In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the Language A: Literature course does not limit the study of works to the products of one culture or the cultures covered by any one language. The study of works in translation is especially important in introducing students, through literature, to other cultural perspectives. The response to the study of literature is through oral and written communication, thus enabling students to develop and refine their command of the language. Language A: Literature is a flexible course that allows teachers to choose works from prescribed lists of authors and to construct a course that suits the particular needs and interests of their students. It is divided into four parts, each with a particular focus: Part 1: Works in translation; Part 2: Detailed study; Part 3: Literary genres; Part 4: Options (in which works are freely chosen). 

    LITERATURE HL YEAR 2             
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    Through the study of a wide range of literature, the Language A: Literature course encourages students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches. In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the Language A: Literature course does not limit the study of works to the products of one culture or the cultures covered by any one language. The study of works in translation is especially important in introducing students, through literature, to other cultural perspectives. The response to the study of literature is through oral and written communication, thus enabling students to develop and refine their command of the language. Language A: Literature is a flexible course that allows teachers to choose works from prescribed lists of authors and to construct a course that suits the particular needs and interests of their students. It is divided into four parts, each with a particular focus: Part 1: Works in translation; Part 2: Detailed study; Part 3: Literary genres; Part 4: Options (in which works are freely chosen).

    MATHEMATICS HL YEAR 1    
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    The course focuses on developing important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible, coherent and rigorous way. This is achieved by means of a carefully balanced approach. Students are encouraged to apply their mathematical knowledge to solve problems set in a variety of meaningful contexts. Development of each topic should feature justification and proof of results. Students embarking on this course should expect to develop insight into mathematical form and structure and should be intellectually equipped to appreciate the links between concepts in different topic areas. They should also be encouraged to develop the skills needed to continue their mathematical growth in other learning environments. This course is a demanding one, requiring students to study a broad range of mathematical topics through a number of different approaches and to varying degrees of depth.

    MATHEMATICS HL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    The International Baccalaureate Organization provides the following description for the teaching of mathematics and Mathematics HL: “The course focuses on developing important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible, coherent and rigorous way. This is achieved by means of a carefully balanced approach. Students are encouraged to apply their mathematical knowledge to solve problems set in a variety of meaningful contexts. Development of each topic should feature justification and proof of results. Students embarking on this course should expect to develop insight into mathematical form and structure and should be intellectually equipped to appreciate the links between concepts in different topic areas. They should also be encouraged to develop the skills needed to continue their mathematical growth in other learning environments. . . This course is a demanding one, requiring students to study a broad range of mathematical topics through a number of different approaches and to varying degrees of depth.”

    MATHEMATICS SL YEAR 1  
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    The course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques. The intention is to introduce students to these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way, rather than insisting on the mathematical rigor required for mathematics HL. Students should, wherever possible, apply the mathematical knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context.  

    MATHEMATICS SL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    The course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques. The intention is to introduce students to these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way, rather than insisting on the mathematical rigor required for mathematics HL. Students should, wherever possible, apply the mathematical knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context. 

    MATHEMATICAL STUDIES SL YEAR 1
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    The course syllabus focuses on important mathematical topics that are interconnected. The syllabus is organized and structured with the following tenets in mind: placing more emphasis on student understanding of fundamental concepts than on symbolic manipulation and complex manipulative skills; giving greater emphasis to developing students’ mathematical reasoning rather than performing routine operations; solving mathematical problems embedded in a wide range of contexts; using the calculator effectively. The course includes project work, a feature unique to mathematical studies SL within group 5. Each student completes a project, based on their own research; this is guided and supervised by the teacher. The project provides an opportunity for students to carry out a mathematical study of their choice using their own experience, knowledge, and skills acquired during the course. This process allows students to take sole responsibility for a part of their studies in mathematics. 

    MATHEMATICAL STUDIES SL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    The course syllabus focuses on important mathematical topics that are interconnected. The syllabus is organized and structured with the following tenets in mind: placing more emphasis on student understanding of fundamental concepts than on symbolic manipulation and complex manipulative skills; giving greater emphasis to developing students’ mathematical reasoning rather than performing routine operations; solving mathematical problems embedded in a wide range of contexts; using the calculator effectively. The course includes project work, a feature unique to mathematical studies SL within group 5. Each student completes a project, based on their own research; this is guided and supervised by the teacher. The project provides an opportunity for students to carry out a mathematical study of their choice using their own experience, knowledge, and skills acquired during the course. This process allows students to take sole responsibility for a part of their studies in mathematics.  

    MUSIC SL YEAR 1
    2.5 Credits, Grade 11
    The IB Diploma Programme standard level music course seeks to develop students’ knowledge and potential as musicians, both personally and collaboratively. IB Diploma Programme music students are required to study musical perception and actively listen to a wide range of music from different parts of the world, musical cultures and time periods. They also develop aural perception and understanding of music by learning about musical elements, including form and structure, notations, musical terminology and context. Through the course of study, students become aware of how musicians work and communicate. This course also provides all students with the opportunity to engage in the world of music as lifelong participants. In addition, the course enables students to enjoy lifelong engagement with the arts, become informed, reflective and critical practitioners in the arts understand the dynamic and changing nature of the arts explore and value the diversity of the arts across time, place and cultures express ideas with confidence and competence develop perceptual and analytical skills develop their knowledge and potential as musicians, both personally and collaboratively.

    PHYSICS SL YEAR 1
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    IB Physics SL covers the core topics of measurements and uncertainties, mechanics, thermal physics, waves, electricity and magnetism, circular motion and gravitation, atomic, nuclear and particle physics, and energy production. Optional topics such as relativity, engineering physics, imaging, and astrophysics will also be covered. Through studying physics, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the scientific method may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work. 

    PHYSICS SL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    The International Baccalaureate Organization provides the following description for Physics SL: “IB Physics SL covers the core topics of measurements and uncertainties, mechanics, thermal physics, waves, electricity and magnetism, circular motion and gravitation, atomic, nuclear and particle physics, and energy production. Optional topics such as relativity, engineering physics, imaging, and astrophysics will also be covered. Through studying physics, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the scientific method may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work.”

    SPANISH HL YEAR 1
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    Language B is an additional language-learning course designed for students with some previous learning of that language. It may be studied at either SL or HL. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts and should be related to the culture(s) concerned. The material should be chosen to enable students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding. It should not be intended solely for the study of specific subject matter or content.” In most cases, both SL and HL courses consist of the same educational aims, core syllabus and curriculum and assessment models. HL courses typically also include a range of additional elements designed to allow students to explore areas of interest within the subject in more depth. In this sense, SL courses are not watered down versions of their HL counterparts. The assessment criteria are equally demanding for both levels, and SL exams are marked and standardized with the same rigor as all IB coursework. 

    SPANISH HL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    Language B is an additional language-learning course designed for students with some previous learning of that language. It may be studied at either SL or HL. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts and should be related to the culture(s) concerned. The material should be chosen to enable students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding. It should not be intended solely for the study of specific subject matter or content.” In most cases, both SL and HL courses consist of the same educational aims, core syllabus and curriculum and assessment models. HL courses typically also include a range of additional elements designed to allow students to explore areas of interest within the subject in more depth. In this sense, SL courses are not watered down versions of their HL counterparts. The assessment criteria are equally demanding for both levels, and SL exams are marked and standardized with the same rigor as all IB coursework. 

    SPANISH SL YEAR 1
    5 Credits, Grade 11
    Language B is an additional language-learning course designed for students with some previous learning of that language. It may be studied at either SL or HL. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts and should be related to the culture(s) concerned. The material should be chosen to enable students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding. It should not be intended solely for the study of specific subject matter or content.” In most cases, both SL and HL courses consist of the same educational aims, core syllabus and curriculum and assessment models. HL courses typically also include a range of additional elements designed to allow students to explore areas of interest within the subject in more depth. In this sense, SL courses are not watered down versions of their HL counterparts. The assessment criteria are equally demanding for both levels, and SL exams are marked and standardized with the same rigor as all IB coursework.

    SPANISH SL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    Language B is an additional language-learning course designed for students with some previous learning of that language. It may be studied at either SL or HL. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts and should be related to the culture(s) concerned. The material should be chosen to enable students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding. It should not be intended solely for the study of specific subject matter or content.” In most cases, both SL and HL courses consist of the same educational aims, core syllabus and curriculum and assessment models. HL courses typically also include a range of additional elements designed to allow students to explore areas of interest within the subject in more depth. In this sense, SL courses are not watered down versions of their HL counterparts. The assessment criteria are equally demanding for both levels, and SL exams are marked and standardized with the same rigor as all IB coursework.

    THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE YEAR 1
    1.25 Credits, Grade 11
    While there are arguably many ways of knowing, the TOK course identifies eight specific ways of knowing (WOKs). They are language, sense perception, emotion, reason, imagination, faith, intuition, and memory. Students must explore a range of ways of knowing, and it is suggested that studying four of these eight in depth would be appropriate. The WOKs have two roles in TOK: they underlie the methodology of the areas of knowledge and they provide a basis for personal knowledge. Discussion of WOKs will naturally occur in a TOK course when exploring how areas of knowledge operate. Since they rarely function in isolation, the TOK course should explore how WOKs work, and how they work together, both in the context of different areas of knowledge and in relation to the individual knower. This might be reflected in the way the TOK course is constructed. Teachers should consider the possibility of teaching WOKs in combination or as a natural result of considering the methods of areas of knowledge, rather than as separate units. 

    THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE YEAR 2
    1.25 Credits, Grade 12
    While there are arguably many ways of knowing, the TOK course identifies eight specific ways of knowing (WOKs). They are language, sense perception, emotion, reason, imagination, faith, intuition, and memory. Students must explore a range of ways of knowing, and it is suggested that studying four of these eight in depth would be appropriate. The WOKs have two roles in TOK: they underlie the methodology of the areas of knowledge and they provide a basis for personal knowledge. Discussion of WOKs will naturally occur in a TOK course when exploring how areas of knowledge operate. Since they rarely function in isolation, the TOK course should explore how WOKs work, and how they work together, both in the context of different areas of knowledge and in relation to the individual knower. This might be reflected in the way the TOK course is constructed. Teachers should consider the possibility of teaching WOKs in combination or as a natural result of considering the methods of areas of knowledge, rather than as separate units. 

    VISUAL ARTS SL YEAR 1
    2.5 Credits, Grade 11
    The IB Diploma Programme visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts. Supporting the International Baccalaureate mission statement and learner profile, the course encourages students to actively explore the visual arts within and across a variety of local, regional, national, international and intercultural contexts. Through inquiry, investigation, reflection and creative application, visual arts students develop an appreciation for the expressive and aesthetic diversity in the world around them, becoming critically informed makers and consumers of visual culture.

    VISUAL ARTS SL YEAR 2
    5 Credits, Grade 12
    The IB Diploma Programme visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts. Supporting the International Baccalaureate mission statement and learner profile, the course encourages students to actively explore the visual arts within and across a variety of local, regional, national, international and intercultural contexts. Through inquiry, investigation, reflection and creative application, visual arts students develop an appreciation for the expressive and aesthetic diversity in the world around them, becoming critically informed makers and consumers of visual culture.